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Importance of Regular Maintenance

Aircraft maintenance is one of the most important activities that aircraft owners should never underestimate. This is a set of activities that include inspection, reformation and repair of an aircraft. As the owner of an aircraft, you need to know every detail about maintenance if you want to save money and avoid failure in your aircraft system. Aircraft maintenance is not only about replacing a part that is already damaged; this is also about cleaning and refueling. This should be done not only to large planes but also to smaller aircrafts. Maintaining your aircraft is done as a compliance with the rules on aircraft ownership.

Benefits of Regular Mainenance

Helps avoid lost flights because of failure. One of the main steps in completing this activity is the replacement of batteries and other parts that are damaged. To maintain good performance. The reason why there is regular maintenance is to make sure that the aircraft is going to work well every time it flies. To ensure passenger safety. Another reason for aircraft maintenance is to avoid accidents that can be caused by failures. This is mainly done in order to protect passengers. Helps extend the life of the aircraft. And finally, an aircraft needs regular maintenance to prolong its life and to make sure that it will perform well for the expected period of time.

Why Choose Us?

Vera Aviation and Touch & Go Aeroworks are a premier aircraft maintenance company with many years in business and a staler reputation. We are a based in South Florida but we have the capability to attend maintenance call in all 50 estates and also overseas. Our technician are trained and certified with many years working in aircraft maintenance services. We only use high quality parts to attend the manufactures specifications and to guarantee airworthiness and reliability of your aircraft. Quality, services and customer satisfaction are a must for us and we have exceed many of our customer experiences with maintenance. Give us a call and schedule an appointment.

About Us

Vera Aviation and Touch and Go Aeroworks, has been serving the Aviation Community since 2008 with Integrity and Professionalism. The key to Vera Aviation and Touch and Go Aeroworks reputation is the experience and expertise of its people. Most of Vera Aviation and Touch and Go Aeroworks technicians have been with the company for more than five years. The people at Vera Aviation and Touch and Go Aeroworks pride themselves on providing their customers with quality service. Whether your visit is for scheduled or unscheduled maintenance, Vera Aviation and Touch and Go Aeroworks have the personnel and experience to meet the challenge.

Vera Aviation and Touch and Go Aeroworks staff is highly trained and experienced A&P and IA FAA certified mechanics with general aviation, commercial & military aviation background. Our team has been dedicated to providing quality customer service and our reputation has grown out of their personal interest in each aircraft they maintain and each customer they serve.

Mr. Brian Michael Vera

President/CEO

U.S Navy Veteran

Graduate from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

ATP Pilot and Aircraft Owner

A&P and IA FAA Certified

Bilingual (Spanish/English)

Mrs. Vanessa Vera

General Manager

Graduate from Santa Maria University (Venezuela)

Major in Industrial Administration

Aircraft Owner

Real Estate Agent

Bilingual (Spanish/English)

Our Services

Pitot-Static System / RVSM

Vera Aviation & Touch and Go Aeroworks, South Florida’s premier Pitot/Static and Transponder testing repair station. We have been specializing in mobile FAR 91.411 and 91.413 tests, troubleshooting and repairs on general aviation and business jet aircraft. We can send our specialized equipment and highly trained technician directly to your aircraft, saving you time and money. Vera Aviation & Touch and Go Aeroworks is an FAA approved certified repair station, we are within a convenient range to service many airports in the greater South Florida area.

Vera Aviation & Touch and Go Aeroworks performs pitot static and transponder testing on all general aviation aircraft.  We are authorized by the FAA to perform RVSM (Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums) tests and inspections of air data computers and their associated systems.  TCAS compliance testing is also available. All of these capabilities are mobile and we have available the latest test equipment required for RVSM compliance.

IFR Certification Per CFR 91.411

We are able to certify and adjust Altimeters, Static Systems, Altitude Encoders, Airspeed Indicators, Vertical Speed Indicators and other precision pressure sensing instruments.  All work is accomplished by an FAA certified repairman with AP-IA (not all repair stations use certified mechanics). We also specialize in experimental aircraft certifications.

Inspections Required for IFR operations:

Transponder, altimeter, static system and automatic altitude encoder must be inspected and certified every 24 months in accordance with the requirements of CFR Parts 91.411 and 91.413

  • The altimeter is removed for bench testing where it is subjected to various tests to ensure accuracy (Part 43 Appendix E).
  • Data correspondence between automatically reported pressure altitude encoder data and the pilot’s altitude reference is checked and adjusted.
  • Static system leak check is accomplished to ensure a leak free system (Part 23.1325).
  • Transponder tested for proper operation (Part 43 Appendix F)

High Accuracy RVSM Pitot-Static System Test Equipment:

Our  “State of the Art” test equipment includes a high accuracy DFW Instruments Corporation DPST-8000M Digital RVSM Compliant Pitot-Static test set and ZSAY-3 static system adapter.

Altitude Performance (NIST Traceable)Range: -1,500 ft. to 55,000 ft.

Resolution: 1 ft.

Accuracy:

±2 ft. @ 0 ft.

±5 ft. @ 35,000 ft.

±12 ft. @ 55,000 ft.

Airspeed PerformanceRange: 10 to 600 Knots

Resolution: 0.1 Knots

Accuracy:

±0.5 Knots@ 20 knots

±0.05 Knots @ 600 knots

DFW Corp. DPST-8000M                            Static System Adapter

CFR  ref’s:

§ 91.411   Altimeter system and altitude reporting equipment tests and inspections.

(a) No person may operate an airplane, or helicopter, in controlled airspace under IFR unless—

(1) Within the preceding 24 calendar months, each static pressure system, each altimeter instrument, and each automatic pressure altitude reporting system has been tested and inspected and found to comply with appendices E and F of part 43 of this chapter;

(2) Except for the use of system drain and alternate static pressure valves, following any opening and closing of the static pressure system, that system has been tested and inspected and found to comply with paragraph (a), appendix E, of part 43 of this chapter; and

(3) Following installation or maintenance on the automatic pressure altitude reporting system of the ATC transponder where data correspondence error could be introduced, the integrated system has been tested, inspected, and found to comply with paragraph (c), appendix E, of part 43 of this chapter.

(b) The tests required by paragraph (a) of this section must be conducted by—

(1) The manufacturer of the airplane, or helicopter, on which the tests and inspections are to be performed;

(2) A certificated repair station properly equipped to perform those functions and holding—

(i) An instrument rating, Class I;

(ii) A limited instrument rating appropriate to the make and model of appliance to be tested;

(iii) A limited rating appropriate to the test to be performed;

(iv) An airframe rating appropriate to the airplane, or helicopter, to be tested; or

(3) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating (static pressure system tests and inspections only).

(c) Altimeter and altitude reporting equipment approved under Technical Standard Orders are considered to be tested and inspected as of the date of their manufacture.

(d) No person may operate an airplane, or helicopter, in controlled airspace under IFR at an altitude above the maximum altitude at which all altimeters and the automatic altitude reporting system of that airplane, or helicopter, have been tested.

§ 91.413   ATC transponder tests and inspections.

(a) No persons may use an ATC transponder that is specified in 91.215(a), 121.345(c), or §135.143(c) of this chapter unless, within the preceding 24 calendar months, the ATC transponder has been tested and inspected and found to comply with appendix F of part 43 of this chapter; and

(b) Following any installation or maintenance on an ATC transponder where data correspondence error could be introduced, the integrated system has been tested, inspected, and found to comply with paragraph (c), appendix E, of part 43 of this chapter.

(c) The tests and inspections specified in this section must be conducted by—

(1) A certificated repair station properly equipped to perform those functions and holding—

(i) A radio rating, Class III;

(ii) A limited radio rating appropriate to the make and model transponder to be tested;

(iii) A limited rating appropriate to the test to be performed;

(2) A holder of a continuous airworthiness maintenance program as provided in part 121 or §135.411(a)(2) of this chapter; or

(3) The manufacturer of the aircraft on which the transponder to be tested is installed, if the transponder was installed by that manufacturer.

§ 23.1325   Static pressure system.

(a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case connections must be so vented that the influence of airplane speed, the opening and closing of windows, airflow variations, moisture, or other foreign matter will least affect the accuracy of the instruments except as noted in paragraph (b)(3) of this section.

(b) If a static pressure system is necessary for the functioning of instruments, systems, or devices, it must comply with the provisions of paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) The design and installation of a static pressure system must be such that—

(i) Positive drainage of moisture is provided;

(ii) Chafing of the tubing, and excessive distortion or restriction at bends in the tubing, is avoided; and

(iii) The materials used are durable, suitable for the purpose intended, and protected against corrosion.

(2) A proof test must be conducted to demonstrate the integrity of the static pressure system in the following manner:

(i) Unpressurized airplanes. Evacuate the static pressure system to a pressure differential of approximately 1 inch of mercury or to a reading on the altimeter, 1,000 feet above the aircraft elevation at the time of the test. Without additional pumping for a period of 1 minute, the loss of indicated altitude must not exceed 100 feet on the altimeter.

(ii) Pressurized airplanes. Evacuate the static pressure system until a pressure differential equivalent to the maximum cabin pressure differential for which the airplane is type certificated is achieved. Without additional pumping for a period of 1 minute, the loss of indicated altitude must not exceed 2 percent of the equivalent altitude of the maximum cabin differential pressure or 100 feet, whichever is greater.

(3) If a static pressure system is provided for any instrument, device, or system required by the operating rules of this chapter, each static pressure port must be designed or located in such a manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the airplane encounters icing conditions. An antiicing means or an alternate source of static pressure may be used in showing compliance with this requirement. If the reading of the altimeter, when on the alternate static pressure system differs from the reading of the altimeter when on the primary static system by more than 50 feet, a correction card must be provided for the alternate static system.

(c) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, if the static pressure system incorporates both a primary and an alternate static pressure source, the means for selecting one or the other source must be designed so that—

(1) When either source is selected, the other is blocked off; and

(2) Both sources cannot be blocked off simultaneously.

(d) For unpressurized airplanes, paragraph (c)(1) of this section does not apply if it can be demonstrated that the static pressure system calibration, when either static pressure source is selected, is not changed by the other static pressure source being open or blocked.

(e) Each static pressure system must be calibrated in flight to determine the system error. The system error, in indicated pressure altitude, at sea-level, with a standard atmosphere, excluding instrument calibration error, may not exceed ±30 feet per 100 knot speed for the appropriate configuration in the speed range between 1.3 VS0with flaps extended, and 1.8 VS1with flaps retracted. However, the error need not be less than 30 feet.

(f) [Reserved]

(g) For airplanes prohibited from flight in instrument meteorological or icing conditions, in accordance with §23.1559(b) of this part, paragraph (b)(3) of this section does not apply.

Testimonials

Michael Spencer – Indianapolis

Brian and his staff at Vera Aviation and Touch & Go Aeroworks have been nothing short of outstanding. He and his staff are flexible, honest, safety conscious, and up front. There is never doubt that they put the interests and safety of its operators first. Their staff are very well trained and they do just a fantastic work with attention to details and more important within the specs to make sure all the components are in proper order. Amazing group of people and I highly recommend them.

Peter Mercy – Fort Lauderdale

Brian has done the the maintenance on our 407 for several years. He has done an excellent job keeping us flying and with the cost of owning helicopters, he understands the importance of keeping costs down. The facility is outstanding the technicians are highly qualified and knowledgeable, they are safety conscious and follow the specs by the book. The price is very fair and I couldn’t be happier.  Excellent shop that I highly recommend.

George Martin – Savana

Our aircraft have to be ready to go at moment’s notice and that’s the reason we only have Vera Aviation and Touch & Go Aeroworks service our aircraft. We’ve had Brian Vera and his staff service our aircraft for over 4 years; you won’t find a better service center. It’s impressive the way they treat every single part and the attention to detail e bar none. The crew is amazing, always happy to inform you about the progress and keeping you updated. If you are looking for and aircraft maintenance facility you should check them out.

Brandon Knots – Port Saint Lucie

I had my Mooney M20J painted over the winter by the Vera Aviation and Touch & Go Aeroworks at their facility. The job was customized to exacting specs and designed to my liking every step of the way. The aircraft was disassembled and re-assembled as required with new hardware, fairings, etc. and really gives the appearance of a new plane … with a number of compliments from the hangar rats! The final color scheme and appearance was superior! I am very satisfied with their hard work!

FAQ

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY AIRCRAFT REQUIRES AN IFR TEST?

FAR 91.411 states that no person may operate an aircraft in controlled airspace under IFR unless within the preceding 24 calendar months, each static pressure system, each altimeter instrument, and each automatic pressure altitude reporting system has been tested and inspected and found to comply with appendices E and F of part 43 of this chapter.

Summary: If you fly your aircraft in IFR conditions in any controlled airspace, you need a 24 month altimeter/static and transponder test.

DO I HAVE TO BE THERE AT THE TIME THE TESTS ARE DONE?

No. It is very normal for us to test aircraft without the owner present. You just need to make arrangements for access to the aircraft and payment. We will take care of the rest. You can also coordinate with your maintenance provider to have the tests completed while your aircraft is in for scheduled maintenance or inspections.

WHAT ARE THE RULES FOR EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT ON TRANSPONDER, ALTIMETER, ALTITUDE ENCODER AND STATIC SYSTEM CHECKS?

If you have a transponder installed in your aircraft, you must comply with the testing requirements. The requirements of 14 CFR 91.215, 91.217, and 91.411 apply to all aircraft with such equipment installed, regardless of certification category.

You must also comply with 91.205 and 91.411 if you fly IFR.

Are CFR Parts 91 & 43 applicable to Experimental Aircraft?

Your aircraft Ops Spec requires that the aircraft be operated in accordance with Part 91 as applicable. Part 91 then directs you to Part 43 Appendix E & F for the testing requirements. So in this case, Part 43 does apply to experimental aircaft.

WILL I HAVE TO CALL MY MECHANIC TO MAKE THE REPAIRS IF THE TESTS DO NOT PASS?

No. Vera Aviation Service’s technician is specifically trained in testing and repair of Pitot/Static Pressure, and Transponder systems. Most repairs, if required, will be completed at the time of the inspection. We stock most parts to make repairs on these systems. This saves the customer time and money by not requiring repairs to be separately scheduled with another shop. You will be quoted on pricing before any repairs are made.

HOW OFTEN MUST THE IFR OR VFR TESTS BE COMPLETED?

The IFR and VFR tests are both 24 month tests. Once your aircraft is tested the next test is due in 24 months by the last calendar day of the month. Example: If you have your aircraft tested on March 16 2013, the next test will be due by March 31 2015.

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY AIRCRAFT REQUIRES A VFR TEST?

FAR 91.413 states that no person may use an ATC transponder that is specified in 91.215(a), 121.345(c), or 135.143(c) of this chapter unless, within the preceding 24 calendar months, the ATC transponder has been tested and inspected and found to comply with Appendix F of part 43 of this chapter; and…

Summary: If you fly your aircraft in VFR conditions in any controlled airspace, you need a 24 month transponder test/inspection.

IS THERE AN EXEMPTION FOR AIRCRAFT WHICH DO NOT HAVE A TRANSPONDER INSTALLED?

Yes. FAR 91.215 (3) states: Notwithstanding paragraph (b)(2) of this section, any aircraft which was not originally certificated with an engine driven electrical system or which has not subsequently been certified with such a system installed, balloon or glider may conduct operations in the airspace within 30 nautical miles of an airport listed in appendix D, section 1 of this part provided such operations are conducted-

  1. Outside and class A, Class B, or class C airspace area; and
  2. Below the altitude ceiling of a class B or class C airspace area designated for an airport or 10,000 feet msl; whichever is lower; and…

Summary: An aircraft which never had an electrical system or transponder installed can legally fly in uncontrolled airspace and does not require testing. It also may fly into controlled airspace if granted a deviation by ATC. FAR 91.215 (d) (3) Gives some guidance for ATC Authorized Deviations through controlled airspace and states that Requests for ATC deviations must be made to ATC at least one hour prior to the proposed flight.

IS MOBILE SERVICE AVAILABLE AT MY LOCATION, OR DO I HAVE TO FLY THE AIRCRAFT TO GERDES AVIATION SERVICES TO HAVE THE TESTS COMPLETED?

Our repair station is certified to perform tests both at our facility and on a mobile basis at any airport in South Florida. Most of our customers take advantage of our mobile service because we do not charge trip fees or mileage fees to come to your location. This saves you both time and money.

WHO CAN PERFORM THE IFR TESTS ON MY AIRCRAFT?

FAR 91.411(b) states that the tests conducted by paragraph (a) of this section must be conducted by:

  1. The manufacturer of the airplane, or helicopter, on which the tests and inspections are to be performed.
  2. A certificated repair station properly equipped to perform those functions and holding-
    1. An instrument rating, Class 1;
    2. A limited instrument rating appropriate to the make and model of appliance to be tested;
    3. A limited rating appropriate to the test to be performed;
    4. An airframe rating appropriate to the airplane, or helicopter, to be tested; or
  3. A certified mechanic with an airframe rating (Static pressure system tests and inspections only.)

Summary: The original manufacturer of the aircraft, a certified repair station, or an airframe mechanic can perform the tests. However an airframe mechanic can only test the static/pressure systems, he cannot test the transponder as required by FAR 91.413.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO COMPLETE AN IFR OR VFR INSPECTION?

An IFR certification test generally takes 2 to 2½ hours to complete including paperwork.

A VFR certification test is much less involved and will generally take 1 to 1½ hours to complete including paperwork.

WILL I HAVE TO WAIT FOR THE PAPERWORK AND LOGBOOK SIGNOFF TO BE MAILED TO ME IF I TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE MOBILE SERVICE?

No. All paperwork and logbook entries are provided to the customer at the end of the tests, regardless of whether the tests are completed at our facility or on a mobile basis at your location.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO COMPLETE AN IFR CERTIFICATION?

IFR Certifications on a single engine non pressurized aircraft typically take around 4 hours to complete. For a pressurized twin with dual Pitot-Static systems it typically takes around 8 hours to complete.

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